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Wood Types

Amboyna Burl: This species is the rarest of the burls. Tight burly figure and beautiful reddish-orange color with burl 'eyes'; machines & turns well. High lustrous finish. S.E. Asia

 

Bethlehem Olive Wood from the Holy Land: Rare Olive wood pen blanks are produced from the trimmings of the olive trees that grow in the Holy City of Bethlehem in the Holy Land. No Tree is damaged or destroyed in the process of harvesting this wood. Each blank is inspected for color, grain, and to be free of defects and cracks.

Olive wood that we sell is from the trimmings of olive trees that grow in the Holy city of Bethlehem in the Holy Land. Trimming of the olive trees is an essential process for a healthier growth for the trees. No tree is damaged or destroyed in the process. Certificate of Authenticity included with pen.

 

Bloodwood: Commonly referred to as "cardinal wood" due to its red to crimson color and tight straight interlocking grain. Excellent for turning. South America

 

Bocote: Rich golden brown with a pinkish tint, often showing variegated irregular markings and an attractive ray fleck figure when quartersawn. It is straight-grained with a medium-coarse texture. Machines well, excellent turning stock. Bocote is found throughout the West Indies, tropical America, Africa, Asia, Mexico, Belize and Honduras.

 

Bubinga: Often called African Rosewood, it is red-brown with light red to purple stripes or veining. It is straight-grained, often with irregular and interlocked areas. West Africa.

 

Cherry: Hard, straight grained with firm texture. Sapwood is nearly white; the heartwood is light pinkish brown to deep red, with brown flecks, and will naturally darken with age. The grain is straight with a fine, close pattern. USA

 

Cherry, Brazilian: Reddish brown color and mahogany-like grain, this wood machines and turns well. Color deepens with exposure to light. Central and South America

 

Cocobolo: Hard and heavy wood with irregular grain with a medium to fine texture. Heartwood is a varigated color from purple red to yellow, with black markings. Color varies from orange to deep red with irregular patterns of purple or black. Grain is usually straight and fine textured. Central America: Mexico, Nicaragua and Panama.

 

Desert Ironwood: Ironwood is one of the largest and longest-lived Sonoran Desert plants, reaching 45 feet in height and persisting as long as 1,500 years. It is a single or multi-trunked evergreen tree. Its heavy, dark-brown, "iron-like wood is renowned for making tools, carvings, and weapons. Sonoran Desert.

 

Kingwood (Dalbergia ceaserensis): A member of the rosewood family, the heartwood is a rich violet-brown to black with dark streaks of violet-brown, black, and sometimes golden yellow, often lustrous. The grain is straight with a fine texture. Kingwood is heavy, strong and tough. Brazil.

 

Koa: Koa grows only in the Hawaiian Islands. It is a moderately heavy wood and can range in color from golden orange to a deep reddish brown, with dark brown streaks marking the growth rings, showing as black lines. The grain is interlocked, often with a wavy or fiddle-back pattern. Hawaii, USA

 

Maple Burl: Burl is a wartlike growth that forms on a tree and that, when sliced, produces extremely disoriented grain patterns that are quite attractive, elegant and interesting. Also known as Pacific or Oregon maple, grows in the Pacific Northwest and is one of the softest of the maples, but is heavy and fairly tough. Stabilized.

 

Maple, Birds Eye: A heavy, hard and tough wood. A natural occurrence found predominately in hard maple causes "eyes" to form that give a striking figure to the wood. Straight grain with intermittent eyes makes this a great accent wood. USA

 

Osage Orange: The sapwood is light yellow; the heartwood is golden yellow to bright orange, darkening upon exposure to sunlight. The grain is straight, with a medium to fine texture. It is heavy, hard, strong and durable. Southern USA

 

Padauk: Color is vivid blood red initially, but changes to dark purple-brown with red dark streaks over time. The grain is generally straight to somewhat interlocked. Texture is as fine to medium. The surface of the wood is reported to have a natural sheen. Africa; Cameroon, Zaire, Angola, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and Nigeria.

 

Pink Ivory: Bright pink to watermelon red. Hard & heavy, very fine texture and takes a beautiful polish. One of the rarest woods in the world. East & South Africa.

 

Purpleheart: Medium to hard wood with tight, fairly straight grain with moderate to coarse texture. Brown when cut, darkens to brownish purple when exposed to air. The heartwood is deep purple violet, maturing to dark brown. From Central and Latin America.

 

Rosewood: Varies in color from shades of chocolate-brown to violet-brown to violet, and is irregularly streaked with black or golden brown. The grain is typically straight, occasionally wavy. Texture is medium to coarse and of medium luster. Brazil.

 

Tulipwood: Hard dense wood with a pinkish to yellowish heartwood with pronounced stripes of violet, salmon, and rose. Grain is straight to roey, texture is fine, and wood is highly lustrous with excellent polishing qualities. Has a pleasantly mild fragrance when cut. From Central and Latin America; Brazil, Colombia, Guyana and Venezuela.

 

Walnut: The heartwood is light gray-brown to rich chocolate-brown to deep purplish brown. It has wavy and curly grain colors of light yellowish brown to dark brown or black. Moderately heavy, hard and strong. West Coast, USA

 

Wenge: The sapwood is whitish; the heartwood is dark brown, with fine almost-black veins. A heavy dense wood with straight grain and a coarse texture. Can be difficult to work, but very attractive. Equatorial Africa.

 

Yellowheart: Fine straight grained hardwood with bright yellow color throughout the wood. Machines well and is an excellent turning stock. Central America

 

Zebrawood: Color is light golden-yellow or tan with streaks of dark brown to black, giving a zebra-stripe appearance. Has a high luster, and the grain is usually interlocked or wavy, with a medium to coarse texture and good finishing and polishing characteristics. Medium to heavy hardwood with possible coarse to very coarse grain texture. From Gabon, Cameroon, and Congo in Africa.



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